Law and democracy in the empire of force
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Law and democracy in the empire of force

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Published by University of Michigan in Ann Arbor .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Law -- Congresses,
  • Law -- United States -- Congresses

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by H. Jefferson Powell and James Boyd White.
GenreCongresses.
ContributionsWhite, James Boyd, 1938-, Powell, Jefferson, 1954-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsK555 .L388 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22679526M
ISBN 100472116843
ISBN 109780472116843
LC Control Number2008048160
OCLC/WorldCa271812156

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Law and Democracy in the Empire of Force [James Boyd White and H. Jefferson Powell]. The authors of this book share a concern for the state of law and democracy in our country, which to many seems to have deteriorated badly. Deep changes are visible. Neither law nor democracy can survive where the empire of force dominates Description The authors in this book contend that the relation between law and democracy in the United States has deteriorated badly and that these changes are visible in a wide array of legal and governmental phenomena. Neither law nor democracy can survive where the empire of force dominates. This book agrees that the relation between law and democracy in the US has been deteriorating badly, and that such changes are visible in an array of legal and governmental phenomena, such as legal teaching, judicial opinions, legal practice, and international relations. Get this from a library! Law and democracy in the empire of force. [James Boyd White; Jefferson Powell;] -- The authors of this book share a concern for the state of law and democracy in our country, which to many seems to have deteriorated badly. Deep changes are visible in .

An upcoming conference co-chaired by Duke Law Professor H. Jefferson Powell, will examine apparent changes in the public world, particularly with respect to the fundamental character of law and democracy. “Law and Democracy in the Empire of Force” stems from a sense, shared by Powell and his co-chair, Professor James Boyd White of the University of Michigan School of Law, where the. Empire is thus, unsurprisingly, also influenced by Spinoza. The ideas first introduced in Empire (notably the concept of multitude, taken from Spinoza) were further developed in the books Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire and the book Commonwealth, which were also written by Hardt and Negri. Reception. Reviews. Empire’s Law is first rate–a ‘must read’ for students of international law, politics and ethics. It includes excellent contributions by key theorists and impressive case studies. This provocative and original collection should be read and taught in classes at both undergraduate and graduate level. Hong Kong: Hong Kong police arrested media tycoon and prominent democracy activist Jimmy Lai under a national security law passed in late June, and raided the offices of his flagship newspaper. Lai was shown handcuffed as he was taken away by officers from his home on Monday morning, according to a live feed. He didn’t answer questions from reporters who had quickly assembled.

In a reversal of Gresham’s Law that soft money drives hard money out of circulation, hard diplomacy deprives soft diplomacy of its moral authority. If democracy is to be more than a shibboleth, we need to debate, as did the Congress in , whether the United States is to lead by example or by force . Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.   If you're living near Ann Arbor, you might be interested in this conference at the University of Michigan Law School.. The conference title, "Law and Democracy in the Empire of Force," comes from Simone Weil's essay on the Iliad, where "she uses it to refer not only to systems of military force violence, but to all the ways a culture invites its members to dehumanize others and themselves.".   The long-term risk is that Hong Kong’s historically freewheeling media and publishing scene — part of what underpins the city’s status as an international financial center — will increasingly resemble that of heavily censored China, according to Steve Tsang, director of the China Institute at SOAS University of London. “The scope of free media has been very slowly eroded, and it gave.